Thursday, 10 June 2021

ADELHYD VAN BENDER - HOT STUFF

Adelhyd van Bender, folder #237, 1999-2014, 32 x 29 x 8 cm

ADELHYD VAN BANDER
HOT STUFF
 
Curated by Antonia Gaeta
 
June 18th - July 24th, 2021 
                                          
From Wall to Paper and Back Again

The corpus of work that Adelhyd van Bender developed in the decades before his death in 2014 presents a coherence that I like to define as serial. A horror vacui reveal an enthusiastic drive to explore a theme to its exhaustion. The works are urged by the artist's dedication to the study of symbols, ideas, formulas and motifs: all of them are representations of an imaginary and a search that is more like vertigo.

By anticipating some concept or trying to perceive a pattern in the artist's work, it becomes more clear - among other possible approaches - to opt, in this exhibition, for establishing a dialogical conversation between the physical space where Van Bender lived, his house, and the mental space translated into the sheets of paper, his drawings.

What we see in Hot Stuff is a selection from thousands of A3 and A4 sheets inside binders, once storaged in piles on the walls of the artist's house. Walls that also served as surfaces for drawings with patterns and geometric shapes of pure solids, elementary figures, cosmologies, doodles, words, sketches - some more complex, some slightly nodding, others overlapped and redrawn on top. They all looked more like an attempt to give an order to the universe.

Now, try to forget for a moment that we are in the Delmes & Zander gallery facing works of art and allow me to draw a parallel. Remember the first dialogue from Giordano Bruno's book On Infinity, the Universe and the Worlds (1584):

Elpinus: How is it possible that the universe is infinite?

Philotheus: How is it possible that the universe is finite?

Elpinus: Do you think this infinity can be demonstrated?

Philotheus: Do you think this finiteness can be demonstrated?

Elpinus: Of what extension are you speaking?

Philotheus: And of what limits do you speak?

Adelhyd van Bender’s work unfolds in infinite matrices of voracious thought. The drawings went through various stages: they were photocopied, worked on to insert coloured elements, cut out and pasted. The artist would highlight specific points, some commas and strokes, and then photocopy them again. Sometimes the drawings differed by a letter, and the sheets were worked over and over again in a kaleidoscopic synthesis of intelligibility. An extremely complex work in which ideas appear as eternal and immutable principles constituting an order. It is not a simple logical or abstract process; the artist brought heaven and earth together and proposed a grandiose vision of an infinite cosmos.

Fracastorius: Ad rem, ad rem, si iuvat; too long you have kept us in doubt.

Burquio: Present some argument already, Philotheus, for I shall have great fun listening to this fable or fancy.

Fracastorius: Modestius, Burquio: What will you say if at last the truth convinces you?

Burquio: Though it be true, I would not believe it; for it is not possible that this infinite can be understood by my head, nor digested by my stomach; though indeed, I wish it were as Philotheus says, for if by bad luck I should happen to fall out of this world, I would always find other lands.

The artist managed with his formal grammar to shake up the proportionality between man and cosmos, to raise metaphysical questions, to bring sensitive matter and intelligible matter together, to present an infinity of star worlds as a consequence of the axiom by which the divine essence is infinite in the magnetic fields of his sacred atomic system.

From this perspective, his drawings bear witness to a living universe full of infinite worlds, formulas, π, cubes and cabalistic symbols - a work as meticulous as it is obsessive, voluminous, colourful and with the smell of tobacco.

Antonia Gaeta

Thursday, 27 May 2021

To the End of the World and over the Edge – with Adolf Wölfli

Adolf Wöllfi, installation photo by Jann Averwerser 2021

To the End of the World and over the Edge – with Adolf Wölfli

at Villa Stuck, Munich

on view until July 25th 2021

« The exhibition “To the End of the World and over the Edge – with Adolf Wölfli” touches on issues of being human: creating worlds and salvation, vision and utopia, abuse and reconciliation, meaning and madness. On more than 25,000 pages, the artist and world-creator Adolf Wölfli (1864–1930) combines drawing, poetry and composition into an inspiring total work of art. A selection of 70 works by Adolf Wölfli from the collection of the Adolf Wölfli Foundation, Kunstmuseum Bern, along with 70 works by other world creators, including Jean Arp, Joseph Beuys, William S. Burroughs, VALIE EXPORT, Anselm Kiefer and Constance Schwartzlin-Berberat, are presented on two floors of Franz von Stuck’s historical artist’s residence. The artists whose works are juxtaposed with those of Wölfli were selected based on their artistic approaches, all of which involve transgressing boundaries. 

“To the End of the World and over the Edge – with Adolf Wölfli” is a project combining exhibition, research and experiment. It aims to inspire, enchant and unsettle. At the same time, a sociopolitical issue underlies the project: it criticizes the concept of “outsider art.” To this day, artists who, like Adolf Wölfli, lived in psychiatric institutions are described as “outsiders” and their work as “outsider art.” Adolf Wölfli was an artist and saw himself as such. Art has the power to reconcile opposites and inspire changes. It can transcend boundaries, enable self-knowledge and render categorizations redundant. The current political debate about “inclusion” and “integration” lacks a fundamental perspective: an equity-based view of the other. “To the End of the World and over the Edge – with Adolf Wölfli” conveys the power of art to touch people, to overcome ingrained ways of thinking, and raises questions about freedom and equality. There is no “outsider art.”
There is only art!

All artists included in the exhibition transcend social, political or personal boundaries. They combine the seemingly contradictory and, in doing so, release the power to overcome ingrained thought patterns. The experience of ostracism, discrimination, oppression, illness and crime is the starting point for productive boundary transgressions which manifest themselves both in visionary forms and in very real ways that can be translated into life in society.

In his artistic work, Adolf Wölfli translates his own biography, which is closely linked to the experience of poverty, exploitation and abuse of others, into an imaginary, glorious world creation – the “St. Adolf-Giant-Creation.” The exhibition assembles works from all of Adolf Wölfli's creative phases, from the first surviving drawings from 1904 to drawings and collages from the “Funeral March” (1928–1930), Adolf Wölfli’s last, unfinished work comprising more than 8,300 pages.

Among the boundary-crossing artists included in the exhibition is Joseph Beuys. On view, along with others works by him, is the portfolio he submitted in application for a professorship at the State Art Academy in Düsseldorf in 1962. As a professor,
Joseph Beuys consistently championed opening up the academy. He ignored admission restrictions and had around 400 students. Joseph Beuys viewed the academy as a kind of “world model” – teaching at the academy was an important part of his “expanded concept of art” and provided a basis for “social sculpture.”

Equality for women in society has not been achieved to date. VALIE EXPORT is a pioneer and icon of feminist art. The exhibition brings together three large-format works from the “Body Configurations” series she created between 1972 and 1976. In these “body configurations” VALIE EXPORT relates her body to external structures and, in doing so, conveys the tension between the individual and built, urban reality. Social power structures are revealed.

The Museum Villa Stuck is building a dream machine especially for the exhibition “To the End of the World and over the Edge – with Adolf Wölfli.” The “Dreamachine” was developed in the late 1950s by two beatniks, the painter, poet and multi-media artist Brion Gysin and the mathematician Ian Sommerville. The flicker effects of this dream machine can induce a semi-hypnotic or trance-like state. The “Dreamachine” enables visitors to experience a new state of consciousness. In conjunction with the “Dreamachine,” rare works by Brion Gysin as well as works by his beatnik friend William S. Burroughs are featured in the exhibition. »

The exhibition includes: Adolf Wölfli and the Ariana Painter, Jean Arp, Georg Baselitz, Joseph Beuys, Ernst Bollin, Christian Boltanski, Bertolt Brecht, Udo Breger, Oskar Büttikofer, William S. Burroughs, Henning Christiansen, Nezaket Ekici, Erich Engel, VALIE EXPORT, Charles Gatewood, Fritz Getlinger, Brion Gysin, Birgit Jürgenssen, Anselm Kiefer, Johann Lang, Meret Matter, Constance Schwartzlin-Berberat, Ian Sommerville, Franz von Stuck, Johannes Stüttgen, Karl Valentin.

Find out more about the exhibition here: https://www.villastuck.de/ausstellungen/2021/ende/index.htm

Sammlung at MMK - Museum für Moderne Kunst

Horst Ademeit, untitled, 13.01.1994, mixed media on Polaroid, 9 x 11 cm

Sammlung 

at MMK, Frankfurt

on view until May 30th 2021

« “But do you know what origin is?” Guy-Yanis asks his friend David in Un film dramatique (2019) by Éric Baudelaire. The two school pupils and authors of the film project vehemently discuss the definition of national affiliation, identity, and racism, ultimately resorting to the article on “origine” in Wikipedia. For his language piece Good Boy Bad Boy (1985), Bruce Nauman filmed an actress and an actor synchronously speaking the same one hundred simple sentences. With every repetition, they utter the statements more and more forcefully until finally the speakers’ synchronicity as well as the relationship between truth, meaning, and emotion are entirely out of joint. In Borrowed Lady (2016), Martine Syms choreographs this normative communication space as a kaleidoscope of specific, recognizable gestures and expressions of African American women, some known from the media, others not. Hands, facial play, and the choice and accentuation of the words together form a political and cultural vocabulary with which Syms draws the viewers into spatial discourse. And while the pieces by Horst Ademeit, Thomas Ruff, and Jeff Wall meticulously examine identification and observation as the foundations of surveillance, those by Marlene Dumas, Sammy Baloji, Thomas Bayrle, and Tishan Hsu revolve around religion and ritual, body technology, and gender.

The exhibition presents works from the MMK collection ranging in date from the early 1960s to the present, including some of the museum’s newest acquisitions. »

With artists: HORST ADEMEIT, SILVIA BÄCHLI, SAMMY BALOJI, ÉRIC BAUDELAIRE, THOMAS BAYRLE, VIJA CELMINS, MARLENE DUMAS, ISA GENZKEN, TISHAN HSU, ANNE IMHOF, BARRY LE VA, LEE LOZANO, BRUCE NAUMAN, CADY NOLAND, MARCEL ODENBACH, LAURIE PARSONS, GERHARD RICHTER, CAMERON ROWLAND, THOMAS RUFF, DIRK SKREBER, STURTEVANT, MARTINE SYMS, ABISAG TÜLLMANN, CY TWOMBLY, JEFF WALL, ANDY WARHOL.

Find out more about the exhibition here: www.mmk.art/en/whats-on/sammlung/
 

Thursday, 29 April 2021

The Holding Environment at Bonner Kunstverein

Martin Erhard, Grossblätter für Bogen No. 12 Schleswig = Holstein / Dänemark (Insel Sylt), 1950-1970, 21 x 16 cm, mixed media on paper

at Bonner Kunstverein 

momentarily closed due to COVID-19

"The notion of the holding environment – the slippage between care, dependence, holding and that which fails to hold adequately – loops back in the show in newly conceived and existing works.

The exhibition and its associated events consider care in ways that encompass both its inherent tenderness and something infantilising, sinister or perverse that lies beyond the point where the authenticity of the care becomes unstable. Realised and developed during a pandemic that has intensified tensions of interpersonal dependency and structural fragility, the show speaks of both the urgency and the necessity of care, and of the slippery nature of good intentions in the age of mass individualism.

Formally, this is a show in which containers and thresholds – both actual and metaphoric – are integral to how the space is structured, to how it holds and behaves. That is, the exhibition is understood as having the capacity to embody and relate contradictions that structure psychological and institutional space. The oscillation between the holding environment treated as both physical space and metaphor was proposed by the psychoanalyst and paediatrician Donald Winnicott in works such as Holding and Interpretation (1986).  His writings proceed from the figure of the child, not just as a little person under the tutelage of adults, but also as the submerged one, who is without power and must, by necessity, to negotiate states of dependency. Within Winnicott’s work, the child and the act of holding become a way of understanding a minor politics – a relation to be thought of across scales, from an intimate space to a structural and institutional consideration of dependency. Such a shift between the mundane and the structural carries the risk of losing sight of difference, nuance and attention, one reason why doubt and ambivalence coupled with commitment and empathy are all the more important to the notion of the holding environment. This is a show that aims to stay put in that space, engaging with the pitfalls of a corrupted notion of care, but also with paths for rehabilitation, restoration and restitution, negotiated through a non-selfish spirit of holding.

The Holding Environment is accompanied by a series of events, including a specifically conceived performance and composition by musician Sarah Davachi; Divine Drudgery, a publication edited with James Richards and Leslie Thornton, with contributions and work by Horst Ademeit, Rae ArmantroutTolia Astakhishvili, Ed Atkins, Kirsty Bell, Adelhyd van Bender, Bruce Conner, Fatima Hellberg, Mason Leaver-Yap, Veit Loers, Terence McCormack, James Richards and Leslie Thornton; and talks and events with the writer and poet Fanny Howe the and filmmaker, artist and activist Gregg Bordowitz, amongst others. "

curated by Fatima Hellberg

Find out more about the exbition, that will hopefully reopen soon, here: https://www.bonner-kunstverein.de/en/exhibition-category/current/

Article on Alexandru Chira in BLAU International Magazine Issue No. 4


 



 
In the newest  issue of BLAU INTERNATIONAL magazine you can find a five page article on the  romanian artist Alexandru Chira, written by Gesine Borcherdt. The new issue is now availble for purchase!
 
«In this issue, Georg Baselitz, at 83, will surprise or even shock in the most in-depth magazine interview of his laborious career. Plus, Deana Lawson talks in rare detail about her miraculous work, saying, “We all have this amazing potential power, the ability to occupy different dimensions of reality at once.”»

Find out more about the issue No. 4 here: www.blau-international.com

Wednesday, 14 April 2021

HORST ADEMEIT in « Paranoia und technisches Bild » by Elena Meilicke


Elena Meilicke, Paranoia und technisches Bild Fallstudiem zu einer Medienpathologie,
De Gruyter, 2021

Horst Ademeit, untitled, 1990, mixed media on polaroid, 9 x 11 cm

"In its beginnings around 1980, media archaeology is characterized by a peculiar proximity to the paranoid delusion. Friedrich Kittler conceives of paranoia as a media pathology and develops - keyword "writing down systems" - media archaeological concepts and questions on the basis of paranoid texts. Taking up this complicity between media thinking and paranoia, Elena Meilicke examines conspiracy narratives in terms of their treatment of technical images and asks to what extent an implicit knowledge of photographic image media, their paranoic constitution and paranoizing effects appears in them. In two exemplary case studies on the Imperjalja fragment by the German writer Oskar Panizza (1853-1921) and on the work of the Düsseldorf Polaroid photographer Horst Ademeit (1937-2010), and with recourse to Lacan's theory of the gaze and the image, Meilicke sketches the contours of a specifically paranoid media knowledge. The images of paranoid investigation related to the world and reality turn out, moreover, to be technical artifacts that are at the same time aesthetic, epistemic, and political things - varieties of a paranoid analytic of power that takes a look at infrastructures of the political."

The author Elena Meilicke works at the Institut für Theorie und Praxis der Kommunikation at the Universität der Künste in Berlin. 

Click here to get an insight to the publication: www.degruyter.com/document/doi/10.1515/9783110650372/html

Thursday, 25 March 2021

I‘VE SEEN THINGS YOU PEOPLE WOULDN‘T BELIEVE

 
Installation at Delmes & Zander, Cologne / Video by Johannes Post 

 

I‘VE SEEN THINGS YOU PEOPLE WOULDN‘T BELIEVE   

Alexandru Chira, Albert Leo Peil, George Widener 

(March to April 2021)

RALFS FARBEN_HÜLLENWERK by Lukas Marxt on view at the Videonale in Bonn

Installation View of Ralfs Farben_Hüllenwerk (46:52 min | 3-channel video
installation, mummified dog, helmet, Ytong blocks, tiles, linoleum | 2021)

Ralfs Farben_Hüllenwerk

on view at Videonale in Bonn

from 4.03 until 18.04, 2021

"Ralfs Farben_Hüllenwerk is an immersive multimedia installation by Lukas Marxt and Michael Petri based on the film Ralfs Farben (Ralf's Colors, 2019) by Lukas Marxt. The staging in the exhibition includes objects and digital collages by the protagonist Ralf Lüddemann.


For the 75-minute avant-garde documentary film Ralfs Farben, Marxt worked over a period of five years with Ralf, who is suffering from schizophrenia and lives as a hermit on Lanzarote. The barren dwelling of the mid-fifties man, a former flight instructor, is located near a dam in inhospitable surroundings. Marxt got to know Ralf in 2012, when the filmmaker wanted to face a four-week attempt at isolation on Lanzarote; after a week, he met Ralf, and from then on the fascination for his thought cosmos determined his own work. In the course of the filming in 2017, Michael Petri joined the team as an artistic ›collaborator‹, who also brought a creative counterweight to the constellation of Marxt/Ralf. The content level of the film is dominated by Ralf's statements as voice over and sometimes as text insertions on the film images. The combination of the unfiltered monologues shaped by Ralf's thought constructs with long, aestheticizing long shots creates unusual visual and linguistic poetry and raises both the protagonist's statements and the filmed motifs to a fascinating new level. On a further level, digital collages created by Ralf Lüddemann with MS Paint, so-called ›Tagesschlüssel‹ (Day Keys), and the sound design, a collage of wind noise, electronic score by Marcus Zilz and flute playing, are incorporated. The landscape of the island serves as a counterpart and co-player. Marxt shows, as often in his works, man-made, brute force interventions in nature: in this tableau of wasteland life moves, captured in mesmerizing cinematography. Marxt describes the cinematic procedure: »[...] Ralf thinks in loops, cycles, and ellipses. The disillusionment of the narrative and the destruction of the space-time continuum found their way into the cinematic structure as an expression of what it might feel like when thoughts do not stop and one is isolated in them.«1 The result is undogmatic, it is proliferating, authentic, and always on a respectful eye level with its protagonist – an enchanting experience that is unparalleled in intensity and honesty.

- Elke Kania"

Find the whole video here: https://vimeo.com/marxt

Find further information about Ralfs Farben here: https://www.ralfsfarben.com/

Thursday, 4 March 2021

Delmes & Zander at FIAC Online Viewing Rooms 2021

Albert Leo Peil, La Diva de cinematique Marlene Dietrich, 1990, 32 x 24 cm,
ink on paper

Delmes & Zander is delighted to praticipate at the FIAC Online Viewing Rooms 2021, with works by Albert Leo Peil, George Widener and Alexandru Chira. The Viewing Rooms are taking place online from March 4th-7th.

 

About Albert Leo Peil

Only recently Delmes & Zander received the comprehensive oeuvre of Albert Leo Peil, which has not been exhibited or published before. Peil’s drawings are reminiscent of medieval works with religious themes, at the same time they are covering topics such as space, eroticism or fashion always in his very own, unique style.

Peil was born in 1946 in Berlin. He moved to Nuremberg where he studied two semesters at the Art Academy in the end of the 60s. Albert Leo Peil passed away in 2019.

 

About George Widener

George Widener was born in 1962 in Covington, Kentucky. In his early years, he developed a passion for mathematical computation and all manner of statistics and data, especially calendars. It was his obsessive habit to translate every number that he encountered into a calendar date. Some years later, George Widener, seen as a savant with an extraordinary aptitude for numbers, was diagnosed with the Asperger Syndrome. Later, Widener began to intentionally transform his fascination with numbers to which a collection of calendars, punctilious lists and drawings attest, into artistic works containing complex calendars, palindromes, historical landscapes, and translations of eastern calligraphic scrolls. Since 2000, he has focused particularly on large-format, highly complex drawings in which various aspects of cartography, mathematics, and numerology can be found.

George Widener has been shown solo at at the Hamburger Bahnhof (Berlin, 2013) and in groupshows at the Schirn Kunsthalle (Frankfurt, 2010), the Hayward Gallery (London, 2013), the Palais de Tokyo (Paris, 2015) and the Kunsthal Rotterdam (2016).

  

About Alexandru Chira

Alexandru Chira was born in 1947 in Tauseni, Romania. When his home village Tauseni suffered of yearlong drought during the 1990s Chira started to elaborate a sophisticated land-and-weather improving art equipment, a series of symbolic installations of painted metal, wire and concrete for the invocation of the rain and rainbow. The ensemble 'De-signs towards the sky for the rain and the rainbow' (1994 – 2004) is located on a hill in the middle of the village – a village surrounded by other hills – and is divided into 18 sub-ensembles. Most of his works, either those on canvas or the drawings and objects are inspiring sketches or derivative works related to the monument.

Chira was awarded the PhD in Visual Arts in 2006 for the work ‘On the Project and Utopia in Art – Self-Poetic Approach' and became professor of the Painting Department of the Faculty of Fine Arts at the Bucharest National University of Arts in 2009. Alexandru Chira passed away in 2011.

Chira's works have been presented in the context of various exhibitions, including Lisbon Architecture Triennale, Palácio Sinel de Cordes, Lisbon; The Sao Paolo Biennial Art Exhibition, Sao Paolo; The Visual Arts Museum, Galaţi; and The National Museum of Contemporary Art (MNAC), Bucharest, which presented a Retrospective of the artist in 2015. Since the end of 2017 Delmes & Zander exclusively represent the work of Alexandru Chira. 

Thursday, 25 February 2021

FIAC Online Viewing Rooms 2021

 
Courtesy: FIAC 2021 

The FIAC Art Fair is taking place on an online platform this year. The Online Viewing Rooms bring together 200 galleries from all around the world and will be accessible from March 4th-7th 2021. 

Delmes & Zander is very pleased to announce our participation.

You can find the Exhition List here: https://fiac.viewingrooms.com/

Thursday, 18 February 2021

PHOTO BRUT at The American Folk Art Museum

Horst Ademeit, 4093, mixed media on Polaroid, 9 x 11 cm

at The American Folk Art Museum 

on view from January 24 - June 6, 2021 
The exhibition PHOTO | BRUT is a continuation of the American Folk Art Museum’s commitment to champion the works of self-taught artists—this time with a focus on the ever-changing field of photography, the frontiers and accessibility of which expanded proportionally with the invention of portable and affordable cameras. It welcomes the substantial art brut photography collection of French filmmaker Bruno Decharme and speaks to Decharme’s subjective collecting activity that brought him—without the parameters of a historical framework—from one discovery to another. The exhibition is complemented by the museum’s holdings, as well as by artworks treasured by American collectors and public organizations.
To expose relationships between these various, inimitable artistic postures, PHOTO | BRUT is organized in four loose yet interconnected sections, probing themes of gender expansiveness, intimacy, image appropriation, and conjuring practices that seek connections to the imperceptible.
With works by Horst Ademeit, Steve Ashby, Morton Bartlett, Marcel Bascoulard, John Brill, Felipe Jesus Consalvos, Jesuys Crystiano, Henry Darger, John Devlin, Pepe Gaitán, Pietro Ghizzardi, Lee Godie, Yohann Goetzmann, Kazuo Handa, Marian Henel, Mark Hogancamp, Paul Humphrey, Zdeněk Košek, Alexander Lobanov, Tomasz Machciński, Albert Moser, Norma Oliver, Luboš Plný, Ilmari Salminen, Valentin Simankov, Ichiwo Sugino, Leopold Strobl, Elke Tangeten, Dominique Théate, Miroslav Tichý, Type 42, Zorro, Elisabeth Van Vyve, Eugene Von Bruenchenhein, August Walla, Frédéric, spirit photographers, UFOs and aliens unidentified photographers, and 19th and 20th Century unidentified artists.

Curators: Valérie Rousseau, PhD, Senior Curator, and Bruno Decharme in collaboration with Barbara Safarova, Sam Stourdzé, and Paula Aisemberg.

To find out more about the exhibition visit: https://folkartmuseum.org/exhibitions/photo-brut/ 

Saturday, 23 January 2021

Installation View of RALF LÜDDEMANN - TOT IST DER HUND RUFT DER HASE UND BLEIBT ZU HAUSE






Installation views of Ralf Lüddemann at Delmes & Zander, Cologne, Photos by Johannes Post  


RALF LÜDDEMANN
TOT IST DER HUND RUFT DER HASE UND BLEIBT ZU HAUSE
(DEAD IS THE DOG SHOUTS THE HARE AND STAYS AT HOME)
December 4, 2020 – January 23, 2021